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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> the negotiation of some kind is necessary. >> whichever option you favor. this >> let me go northwest to syria. syria was discussed in the presidential campaign but the more it was discussed there and less difference there seemed to be between the two candidate. it came down to should we be arming the opposition? let me ask that question in a broader context? should we are mccumber opposition and whenever answer to that question is what is the strategic approach to the syrian conflict that preserves or protect american interests at this stage? >> let me begin and that end. the american international -- american position on foreign affairs was for in the aftermath of the second world war, the united states had a position of predominance that was unique in human history and transitory as other nations developed that degree of pre-eminence. at the same time the single most powerful country in the world, and the key to stupidity in many regions and the key to progress in many regions and when you say you are no longer preeminent you have to be able to establish priorities and when you establish pr
and syria. the whole house will be united in concern both at the intolerable situation for the residents of southern israel and the grave loss of life and humanitarian in gaza including the particular impact on children. on the 14th of november, the israeli defense forces began air strikein response to a sharp increase in rocket fire. hamas and other militant groups responded with other rocket fire. as of today, three israeli citizens have been killed and at least 109 palestinians including 33 women and 26 children -- 11 women and 26 children also lled. we have made clear that hamas have the principal responsibility for the start of the current crisis but also that all sides have responsibilities. we quickly called on israel to seek every opportunity to de escalate their militaryesponse and to observe international humanitarian law and avoid civilian casualties. yesterday e.u. foreign ministers condemned the rocket attacks on israel and called for an urgent cessation of hostilities. we have also warned that a ground invasion of gaza could length b the conflict, and erode international su
in and out of israeli cities, civilians, and an ammunition dump from weapons coming in from iran, syria, and they're continuing to do that. now no nation, no people and no government could sit idle when, you know, missiles are being shot indiscriminately against civilians. not in london, not in paris and not in washington. >> no rational person would disagree that the rocket firing has got to stop. it is a senseless activity that can only lead to more bloodshed. however, as i said to prime minister netanyahu when i sat down with him in jerusalem last year, this clear repression, oppression, whatever you want to call it on the gaza strip, these people are desperate and when there are desperate people with desperate policy and no hope, they often turn to terrorist groups whether to foment their fury and anger. where does this terrible cycle end? what is the constructive way through this? >> i want to make something perfectly clear. hamas are the enemies of peace. not just the enemies of israel. they are the enemies of peace, regional stability in the region, and to peace both internally o
of what were initially peaceful protests. obviously the situation in syria has deteriorated since then. we have been extensively engaged with the international community as well as regional powers to help the opposition. we have committed to hundreds of millions of dollars of humanitarian aid to help folks both inside of syria and outside of syria. we are constantly consulting with the opposition on how they can get organized so that they're not splintered and divided in the face of the onslaught from the assad regime. we are in very close contact with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and have an impact and obviously israel, which is having already grave concerns as we do about, for example, movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and that could have an impact not just within syria, but on the region as a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they had in the past. we're going to be talking to them, my envoys will be traveling to, you know, various
peace in the middle east including the civil war ongoing in syria right across the border from israel. >> it's a concentration of chemical weapons. >> are they secure right now? >> they're under the control of assad. i'm not sure they are secure. i wouldn't trust him very much. and they get missiles from iran. and some people say it's okay. what do they mean okay? they're collectors of missiles. they shoot them against civilian life in tel aviv. look, the world must also take a clear position to say it is disproportionate israeli reaction and shooting at israelis proportionate. after israel left gaza, how long can they destroy any chance for reason and peace? >> what's the role of iran that is playing right now behind the scenes in gaza? >> iran it feels competing with egypt. they want to win -- their chance is to have the more extreme on their side. so they support not only hamas but also the jihad. >> islamic jihad? >> islamic jihad in gaza. so the islamic jihad also to be more extreme. other problems in gaza is there's nobody rules it. there's a competition among four or five diffe
like a straightforward issue in terms of intervening on syria, you only have five permanent members of the security council. and they cannot agree on something like this. you know, what has happened, obviously i think in the past couple decades, there's been an information revolution that has led to expectations that you articulated. in the gaza, it is live, in damascus, it is live. we have expectations for action. when we observe things like that, they are not seen it, there were not noted here our expectations are former limited. today, the public is globally connected and has certain expectations. and yet international institutions have not evolved in a powerful way. we still of the same institutions that have a political order since 2002. nobody can figure out how to do it. host: what is your relationship with benjamin netanyahu? guest: i do not have one. host: what about what is going on and syria, supplely into this current conflict? guest: it does. it does in two ways. in one way, it pushed syria off the front pages in the arab world. anytime you have a flare up on palestine,
. >>> as the violence rages here in israel and gaza, peace is also hard to come by in nearby syria. but a major development today could help the rebels gain some ground. standby for that. and we'll have the latest on the secretary of state hillary clinton's push for peace. she's here in jerusalem right now. she's at the prime minister's office meeting with benjamin netanyahu. lots of breaking news happening right here. on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [ male announcer ] and it's not just these owners giving the volt high praise. volt received the j.d. power and associates appeal award two years in a row. ♪ i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my spot? [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress
with syria. that's according to the head of the nato military alliance. he he expects the turks to formally request the patriot air to surface missiles in the coming days any deployment would be for defensive purposes. turkey shares longest border with syria and former allies have recently exchanged rocket fire. meanwhile syrian rebel firefighters claim they seized a military base on 00 outskirts of capital city of damascus and group of islamist within the rebel ranks claims that it has rejected the new western-backed' session group a potential major set back in the effort to topple the syrian president bashar assad. basically i just said it's very confusing. passengers on the italian airliner survived what one of them described as 10 seconds of terror when their plane hit turbulence and plunged some 10,000 feet. airline officials say it happened over the atlantic ocean on a flight from cuba to italy. sudden drop injured 30 people or so. nothing serious but just scrapes and bruises. pilots reported the plane itself is fine. they alan landed safely at their destination in millan. what happen
treaty. >> what about syria? there have been some incidents of fire coming into the israeli part of the golan heights from syria. what's the latest on that? >> our estimation is all the remotes events have to do with stray bullets or stray mortars. nothing more than that. it's an internal conflict inside syria. and that's the way we treat it. >> is it a serious situation on the golan heights right now with syria or is it a temporary thing? >> it's a temporary thing. the borders are quiet. we see it as an internal syrian conflict which has nothing to do with us. >> and you're on the lebanese border with hezbollah, that's quiet as well? >> it's quiet but tense. hezbollah has acquired a huge arsenal of over 60,000 rockets and tried to think how many other militaries in the world even hold these amount of rockets. a speech was given today urging all the arab countries to smuggle rockets into gaza so hamas can use them. >> one final question, iran. what if any role are they playing in all of this? >> iran is, i would say, pulling the strings in many of the terror organizations in the
have had a tense relationship since hamas supported the uprising in syria. what's that relationship and what's iran's role right now? >> absolutely. there are sectarian issues here. iran is predominantly shiite and hamas is predominantly sunni. the leader of hamas moved headquarters out of damascus and sided with the opposition. there is that real tension. in many ways, gaza reflects the kind of rivalry playing out in syria and elsewhere in the region. hamas relies on iran for military training and its most important weaponry, but there is this tension over syria. it's in syria's interest right now to see all the world's attention focused on gaza rather than on damascus to take some of the pressure off. these relationships in the region are shifting. part of what we're seeing, little gaza, it's important not just for what happens on israeli issues but the wider dynamics of the shifting sands across the middle east. >> let me ask you a question about what happens with hamas, depending how this plays out. there's one theory, dennis ross from the washington institute of near east polic
in the conflict in syria. >>trace: not surprising. thank you, jonathan hunt outside the united nations. a journalist and expert on the middle east joins us. i pose the same question to you: will the truce hold. >>guest: it doesn't have too many, we don't have too much hope. we are dealing with a terrorist organization, which is considered by the united states and the west, for hamas. we are not dealing with the palestinian authority leader, and his absence is noted. with the pros and the cons, the consequences being we are creating an artificial truce with a cease-fire, cutting east supply, but are we cutting off demand if iran continues to supply the groups, the terrorist elements it is not just hamas or egypt watching what goes through the sinai peninsula, but, the pros being where the united states is concerned, saying to egypt we are giving you allowance so lay big brother and you watch out what goes on. >>trace: i remember several years back when there was a bus bombing that israel would respond strongly and today there was a bus bombing in tel aviv. are you surprised the cease-fi
by jordan, egypt, lebanon, syria and iraq. but the fledgling country survived. the u.n. passed resolution 194 in december 1948 which allowed ref are geez who wished to live peacefully the right to return home at the earliest practical date. nearly 20 years later in 1967, israel pre 'em tifl struck egyptian forces after the access was blocked to the port. israel gained control over areas including the west bank and gaza strip and east jerusalem. for arabs, this was the beginning of a period of occupation by israel which remains at the center of today's conflict. now, there would be another air rob israeli war in 1973. before that, there's the formation of the plo or the palestinian liberation organization which would be defined by the likes of yasir arafat. in 1978, u.s. president jimmy carter helped to broker the peace accords between saadat of egypt and prime minister ba begin of israel which paved the way for the 1979 peace treaty between those two countries. the lalt '80s saw the formation of hamas in the west bank and gaza erasing hopes. the oslo accords signed -- establishing recogni
of syria, all the murderers and very evil forces in the region that support hamas. it's not their interest of the countries in the region to support hamas. terrorism can spill over. we saw it in egypt. how 16 egyptian soldiers were murdered because of the spillover of terrorism from gaza, ham as. >> all right. thank you very much for coming on and talking about the israeli side of this. we appreciate your time. i want now to get to the other side of the conflict and bring in the chief representative of the general delegation of the palestine liberation organization to the united states. good to talk to you, ambassador and to talk to you again. >> thank you. >> the other day when you were on this program before the cease-fire and i asked you whether you supported hamas, you said when it comes to our differences with hamas we have differences practically. this is normal. but what is happening in the gaza strip, a direct attack on innocent civilians, we're witnessing a deliberate escalation on the part of the israelis to cause as much possible civilian deaths." given that, do you think the ce
on this. who benefits from this is syria and spotlight . syria gets the spotlight off and iran makes the weapon program excel. >> but a lot of people are putting the iranians behind hamas on this. hamas is alienated themselves from the iranians and moved out of sir yampt hamas always would have preferred to work with sunni than shiia and now they have those people to work with and all of the arms they want coming out of libya and tunisia after the arab spring. the reliance on the iranians is much less. >> brian: they sided with the syrian rebels and hesbollah sided with the syrian government. very complicated. great analysis. >> thank you, sir. >> brian: we move on on the run down. the camera was rolling in the moment of immingpact. >> look at that. >> brian: wow. the story behind the video next. candidate obama made this promise to the nation's heroes. >> no veteran should have to wait months or years for the benefits that you earned. >> brian: but the next guest said the president has not delivered. his story will blow you away. my friend told me about a great new way to get deals.
both domestically and internationally. remember, its external base of operations in syria was lost earlier in the year as a result of the civil war there. so really gaza is the only sole source of hamas's legitimacy. but currently in gaza, hamas is facing an enormous amount of pressure from all of these other smaller, much more radical militant groups that are pressuring hamas to be more -- more emphatic in its response as a resistance group against israel instead of maintaining the cease-fire that it has. at the same time, of course, hamas is dealing with the fact that the palestinian authority in the west bank is in the process of applying for nonstate member status at the united nations which would, again, severely decrease hamas's legitimacy as a representative of the palestinian people. so they see this as a way of maintaining their relevancy, if you will. >> interesting. so israel is, of course, tired of rockets from fgaza fired int the country, into israel. some of the talk in israel is definitely hawkish. in an op-ed, the former prime minister's son wrote what does a decisi
further the instability in the surrounding nations. >> and josh, take us to the north. lebanon and syria playing critical roles as well? >> absolutely. let's touch on these. zoom in the video up to lebanon. lebanon has a long history of racked by violence. recently there was an intelligence chief killed in a bombing inside lebanon. also one more thing that you should understand when you think about lebanon and that is the role of hezbollah. i believe we have video of hezbollah here. always a power strug inside lebanon involving hezbollah and the united states and other countries consider a terrorist organization. it's fiercely opposed to israel, any conflict between israel and palestinians can further the instability inside lebanon. finally, maybe last thing what we're talking about here, absolutely not the least, zoom to the east in this map, we're going over to syria which has been one of the biggest stories in the world since march of last year. there's a war raging there. and the opposition has been giving new figures lately about this war. the opposition has been saying that now as
erupted in 2003 to a broad degree, and that now includes syria in turmoil, really in a deep civil war, egypt having had the revolution and change of government. jordan. there was, of course, the conflict in gaza in 2008, and the daenk now if it is, it could be spread. not just to israelis and palestinians, but if you had a conflict that spread throughout the region, it could be hugely destabilizing and costly to everyone involved. >> i think the president is on the right course. it's trying to use all the allies to encourage both parties to step back from an escalation of the conflict. that's very difficult. israel has the right to defend itself against the barrage of rockets that have accelerated dramatically in recent days and no doubt will do so wanting to deter such action in the future. the problem is if this escalates that, could have devastating consequences for all concerned, so it's a tension there trying to accomplish one objective without having it reverse and cause greater damage in the future. >> talk about the role of the arab spring here, because obviously, you have a d
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)